Does Columbia Sportswear Company ($COLM)’s Price to cash of 24.451935 Signal a Buying Opportunity?

Columbia Sportswear Company (COLM) has a Price to Cash Flow ratio of 24.451935, and a current Price to Earnings ratio of 27.230971

The price-to-cash flow ratio measures the current price of the company’s stock relative to the amount of cash generated by the company. The price-to-cash flow multiple is primarily used in the comparable analysis method of stock valuation.

Investors are frequently looking for any possible way to get a leg up in the market. This may involve committing to plan that will hopefully outperform the market and maximize profits. Many investors will choose to employ top-down analysis. Top-down analysis involves examining the big picture of the economy and the world of finance. After studying global economic conditions, investors may then analyze different sectors that are possibly well positioned to beat the market. After identifying the sector or sectors, investors may then do further analysis of stocks within the specific industry in order to find firms that are successful and primed for growth. Other individual investors may choose to go with bottom-up analysis when looking for stock to add to the portfolio. The bottom-up approach takes the emphasis off of the power and significance of market and economic cycles. Investors may focus on individual companies and not worry so much about the specific industry or economy in general. 

The Shareholder Yield is a way that investors can see how much money shareholders are receiving from a company through a combination of dividends, share repurchases and debt reduction. The Shareholder Yield of Columbia Sportswear Company (COLM) is 0.033661. This percentage is calculated by adding the dividend yield plus the percentage of shares repurchased. Dividends are a common way that companies distribute cash to their shareholders. Similarly, cash repurchases and a reduction of debt can increase the shareholder value, too.

NCAV-to-Market

Benjamin Graham, professor and founder of value investing principles, was one of the first to consistently screen the market looking for bargain companies based on value factors. He didn’t have databases such as ValueSignals at his disposal, but used people like his apprentice Warren Buffet to fill out stock sheets with the most important data.

Graham was always on the watch for firms that were so discounted, that if the company went into liquidation, the proceeds of the assets would still return a profit.

The ratio he used to identify these companies was Net Current Asset Value or NCAV. This ratio is much more stringent compared to book value (total assets – total liabilities) and is calculated as follows:

NCAV = Current Assets – Total Liabilities
Current Assets = Cash & ST Investments + Inventories + Accounts Receivable

This strategy was very successful during the years after Graham published it in his book ‘Security analysis’ in 1934 and also in more recent studies it has proven to provide superior results. A study done by the State University of New York to prove the effectiveness of this strategy showed that from the period of 1970 to 1983 an investor could have earned an average return of 29.4%, by purchasing stocks that fulfilled Graham’s requirement and holding them for one year. Nowadays it’s very difficult to find companies that meet Graham’s criteria. Columbia Sportswear Company (COLM) has an NCAV to Market value of 0.153505.

Return on Assets

There are many different tools to determine whether a company is profitable or not. One of the most popular ratios is the “Return on Assets” (aka ROA). This score indicates how profitable a company is relative to its total assets. The Return on Assets for Columbia Sportswear Company (COLM) is 0.121224. This number is calculated by dividing net income after tax by the company’s total assets. A company that manages their assets well will have a higher return, while a company that manages their assets poorly will have a lower return.

The M-Score, conceived by accounting professor Messod Beneish, is a model for detecting whether a company has manipulated their earnings numbers or not. Columbia Sportswear Company (COLM) has an M-Score of -1.924939.  The M-Score is based on 8 different variables: Days’ sales in receivables index, Gross Margin Index, Asset Quality Index, Sales Growth Index, Depreciation Index, Sales, General and Administrative expenses Index, Leverage Index and Total Accruals to Total Assets.  A score higher than -1.78 is an indicator that the company might be manipulating their numbers.

The Return on Invested Capital (aka ROIC) for Columbia Sportswear Company (COLM) is 0.259285.  The Return on Invested Capital is a ratio that determines whether a company is profitable or not.  It tells investors how well a company is turning their capital into profits.  The ROIC is calculated by dividing the net operating profit (or EBIT) by the employed capital.  The employed capital is calculated by subrating current liabilities from total assets.  Similarly, the Return on Invested Capital Quality ratio is a tool in evaluating the quality of a company’s ROIC over the course of five years. The ROIC 5 year average is calculated using the five year average EBIT, five year average (net working capital and net fixed assets).  The ROIC 5 year average of Columbia Sportswear Company (COLM) is 0.315601.

When dealing with the equity markets, investors are often tasked with trying to find stocks that are bound for glory. Every investor dreams of finding those stocks that were overlooked but are poised to pick up momentum. New investors are often instructed to set goals before starting to invest. Creating attainable, realistic goals can be a good starting point before digging into the investment trenches. After setting up goals considering financial status, objectives, timeframes and risk appetite, the next step may involve creating an actionable plan. Once the plan is in place, it may be extremely important to routinely monitor the performance of the portfolio. There are often many well crafted investment plans that for whatever reason don’t seem to be working out properly. Being able to evaluate and adjust the plan based on market activity may end up being the difference between a winning or losing portfolio. Being able to adapt to the fast paced and often times tumultuous market landscape can be a gigantic benefit for long-term portfolio health.

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