Balance of Power Reading in Focus For Pacific Coast Oil Trust (ROYT)

Pacific Coast Oil Trust (ROYT) shares have seen the Balance of Power trend higher over the past few sessions, indicating potential price moves are ahead.

The Balance of Power (BOP), indicator was developed by Igor Livshin and it was introduced in the August 2001 issue of Stocks and Commodities Magazine.  Balance of Power (BOP) measures the strength of the bulls versus the bears by assessing the ability of each to push price to extreme levels.  The BOP indicator represents the strength of the buyers (bulls) vs. the sellers (bears), and oscillates between -100 and 100. The calculation of the BOP = (close – open) / (high – low). A directional change of the BOP can be interpreted as a warning signal and will generally be followed by a price change.

Investors can employ various techniques in order to study stocks. Two of the most widely used techniques are fundamental and technical analysis. Fundamental analysis includes crunching the numbers for specific companies. This may involve reviewing the cash flow statement, income statement, and balance sheet. In essence, fundamental analysts are trying to figure out the company’s value. Once the value of a company is determined, the investor can then make investment decisions based on the research. Using this method, a stock that is trading underneath the intrinsic value may be considered a good pick. Technical traders typically hold the view that all the data they need to know about a stock can be discovered to using charts.

Active traders may be zooming in on certain technical indicators for stock assessment. Currently, Pacific Coast Oil Trust (ROYT) has a 14-day Commodity Channel Index (CCI) of 157.66. The CCI technical indicator can be used to help determine if a stock is overbought or oversold. CCI may also be used to help discover divergences that could possibly signal reversal moves. A CCI closer to +100 may provide an overbought signal, and a CCI near -100 may offer an oversold signal.

We can also do some further technical analysis on the stock. At the time of writing, the 14-day ADX for Pacific Coast Oil Trust (ROYT) is 18.56. Many technical chart analysts believe that an ADX value over 25 would suggest a strong trend. A reading under 20 would indicate no trend, and a reading from 20-25 would suggest that there is no clear trend signal. The ADX is typically plotted along with two other directional movement indicator lines, the Plus Directional Indicator (+DI) and Minus Directional Indicator (-DI). Some analysts believe that the ADX is one of the best trend strength indicators available.

Interested investors may be watching the Williams Percent Range or Williams %R. Williams %R is a popular technical indicator created by Larry Williams to help identify overbought and oversold situations. Investors will commonly use Williams %R in conjunction with other trend indicators to help spot possible stock turning points. Pacific Coast Oil Trust (ROYT)’s Williams Percent Range or 14 day Williams %R currently sits at 0.00. In general, if the indicator goes above -20, the stock may be considered overbought. Alternately, if the indicator goes below -80, this may point to the stock being oversold.

Tracking other technical indicators, the 14-day RSI is presently standing at 70.90, the 7-day sits at 79.72, and the 3-day is resting at 93.72 for Pacific Coast Oil Trust (ROYT). The Relative Strength Index (RSI) is an often employed momentum oscillator that is used to measure the speed and change of stock price movements. When charted, the RSI can serve as a visual means to monitor historical and current strength or weakness in a certain market. This measurement is based on closing prices over a specific period of time. As a momentum oscillator, the RSI operates in a set range. This range falls on a scale between 0 and 100. If the RSI is closer to 100, this may indicate a period of stronger momentum. On the flip side, an RSI near 0 may signal weaker momentum. The RSI was originally created by J. Welles Wilder which was introduced in his 1978 book “New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems”.

For further review, we can take a look at another popular technical indicator. In terms of moving averages, the 200-day is currently at 2.14, the 50-day is 1.88, and the 7-day is resting at 2.01. Moving averages are a popular trading tool among investors. Moving averages can be used to help filter out the day to day noise created by other factors. MA’s may be used to identify uptrends or downtrends, and they can be a prominent indicator for detecting a shift in momentum for a particular stock. Many traders will use moving averages for different periods of time in conjunction with other indicators to help gauge future stock price action.

When compared to technical analysis, fundamental analysis typically uses a longer-term approach. Chartists may use a time horizon of days, hours, or even minutes. Fundamental analysis may track data going back many years. The difference in timeframe between the two can be seen with how each investing style may be used. Traders may only be looking to make quick trades and capitalize on short-term market movements. Longer-term investors may be looking to hold an investment for months or even years. Some investors will use a combination that studies the technicals and the fundamentals. Fundamentals may be used to identify which stock to buy, while viewing the technicals can be used to sort out the timing of the trade.

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